Privacy Notice for Young People

What is a privacy notice?

A privacy notice helps us tell you how we use the information we have about you, like your name, address, date of birth and the notes the doctor or nurse makes about you in your healthcare record. We need a privacy notice to make sure we meet the legal requirements in the new General Data Protection Regulation (or GDPR for short).

What is GDPR?

The GDPR is a new document that helps us keep the information we have about you secure. It’s new and was be introduced on the 25th May 2018, making sure that everyone who cares for you follows the rules and keeps your information safe. We have always looked after your information safely but GDPR helps us check we are doing the best we can.

What information do we collect about you?

We only collect information we need to help us keep you healthy – such as your name, address, information about your parents or adults with parental responsibility, records of appointments, details of treatment and medicines we give you, test results, X-rays. Your medical records are kept for your whole life and travel with you around the country. They are held safely on our computer system and on paper in the surgery.

How do we use your information?

The NHS needs to store information about you to help us care for you. We might need to share this information with other medical teams, such as hospitals, if you need to been seen by a specialist doctor or have tests. Sometimes it is necessary to share information because the practice is required in law to provide it (e.g. by judge or court requesting it). We may be asked to help with medical research. We will always ask you, or your parents or adults with parental responsibility, if it’s okay to share your information. We also share information to help the NHS plan how much money it will cost to care for the population. This does not include your name or other information that could identify you.

We may be asked to help with medical research. We will always ask you, or your parents or adults with parental responsibility, if it’s okay to share your information. We also share information to help the NHS plan how much money it will cost to care for the population. This does not include your name or other information that could identify you.

How do we keep your information private?

We know it is very important to protect the information we have about you. We make sure we follow the rules that are written in the GDPR and other guidance. All our staff are trained and know that they must protect information we have about you.

Can anyone see or use my information at the Doctors?

No, only someone who needs your data to care for you is allowed to see or use it. This can be the doctors, nurses or people who support the doctors and nurses in their work.

Don’t want to share?

From the age of 13 you can make decisions about how your information is used, if you are able to. Otherwise, a parent or adult with parental responsibility normally makes these decisions until you are 16. If someone who isn’t responsible for your care asks for your information, we will need permission from you, your parent or an adult with parental responsibility before we share it. For example, someone organising an activity who needs to know if you are fit enough to take part.

How do I access my records?

If you want to see what is written about you, you have a right to access the information we hold about you, but you will need to complete a Subject Access Request (SAR). Your parents or adults with parental responsibility will normally do this on your behalf if you’re under 16. If you are 13 or over, you may be able to do this yourself. You can ask us to correct and remove information from your record if you feel it is wrong.

What do I do if I have a question?

If you have any questions, ask a member of the surgery team or your parents or adults with parental responsibility. You can ask to speak with Susie the Practice Manager.

What to do if you’re not happy about how we manage your information

We really want to make sure you’re happy, but we understand that sometimes things can go wrong. If you or your parents or adults with parental responsibility are unhappy with any part of our dataprocessing methods, you can complain to the surgery. For more information, visit www.ico.org.uk and select ‘Raising a concern’.